Social Media Doesn’t Kill Human Relationships

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Viviana Valdez — Reporter

More stories from Viviana Valdez

Back to Article
Back to Article

Social Media Doesn’t Kill Human Relationships

Photo by: Bobby Brown

Photo by: Bobby Brown

Photo by: Bobby Brown

Social media has taken over. It’s hard to think of a time where there weren’t sites like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram or Pinterest.

Oh my, how times have changed. The only things I used a computer was for paint, Minesweeper or that awesome pinball game.

People paint social media as the invention which would inevitably destroy us. There have been countless essays and debates over the topic. What are the benefits? What are the negatives? Question after question; it’s never ending.

There are plenty of reasons to believe that social media benefits the world: It makes important news spread faster; it makes us aware of our surroundings. Social media has definitely made us closer to other parts of the world. We’re living in a time where the world is open to us. With a few simple keystrokes, we are able to contact anyone in the world, at any time.

I’ve always favored social media for a simple reason; it has helped me deepen my friendships. Being friends on Tumblr cuts down on hanging out everyday or texting constantly.

Sharing our lives online – the good and the bad, the twists and turns – with people who we think care. Generally, they do. They listen to what you have to say and help you face any problems you may have.

Thanks to Tumblr, however, I’ve met some incredible people who have helped me deal with problems I’ve faced. Staying in touch with people who could have easily turned into distant memories.

People often depict social media as an age of narcissism and boredom. “I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction.

The world will have a generation of idiots.” People love to put words into Albert Einstein’s mouth. This misquoted line was most likely invented by someone looking to expose social media as the symbol for society’s decay.

Is it selfish of me to enjoy Facebook for doing what people have criticized it for? Maybe, however, it makes me feel awesome when I see a simple “like” on a photo or status update from an old elementary friend.

I’m happy to have a platform where I can share good news, especially to friends and family that I hardly see because of distance. It can’t be completely selfish that I enjoy seeing what’s going on in my friends’ lives as well, right?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email